Documentary – Recording the Kings Speech

Tune in tomorrow early 03:32 GMT or stay up late 23:32 GMT for BBC WORLD SERVICE documentary – Delivering the King’s Speech! This programme explores the fascinating history of royalty releasing records, and incorporates rare material from the EMI Archives and an interview with EMI historian Tony Locantro.

Image for Delivering the King's Speech

Marking the 75th anniversary of King George VI’s declaration of war against Germany, Louise Minchin relates the untold story of how the King’s Speech reached the entire world.

Inspired by the discovery of the original pressing of the speech in the EMI Archives – mounted in goatskin leather and signed by the King himself – Louise uncovers how the King’s words reached the furthest corners of the British Empire. Starting with the fascinating history of royalty releasing records, and incorporating rare material from the EMI Archives and interview with EMI historian Tony Locantro.

Delivering The King’s Speech delves into the earliest days of the BBC Empire Service (later to become the BBC World Service) to find out how the King’s message was sent across the globe and how it enabled the Empire Service to win the fight against the anti-British propaganda broadcast by the Germans.

If you’re neither an early bird nor a night owl you can also tune in throughout the day!

8:05 GMT – 14:32 GMT – 19:05 GMT

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p025gvd5

A TBI Media Production for BBC World Service.

On this day: 7th July 1944

Seventy years today,  7th July 1944, a German V1 rocket landed on the EMI factory in Blyth Road, Hayes, as a result a concrete shelter roof collapsed, killing 34 and injuring a further eighteen.

Today we honour the men and women based at the EMI Factory and Hayes, whose contribution was essential to the British War effort, in both civilian and military roles. We particularly remember those who have paid the ultimate sacrifice on that fateful day.

A memorial to those killed in the bomb attack on EMI can be found in Cherry Tree Lane Cemetery.

Memorial at Cherry Tree Lane Cemetery, Hayes. 7th July 2014

Memorial at Cherry Tree Lane Cemetery, Hayes.
7th July 2014

 

Photographs: Courtesy of The EMI Group Archive Trust
Speech: Winston Churchill – War of the Unknown Warrior – Broadcast July 14 1940
Recording: The Gramphone Company, Hayes Middlesex – HMV C.3209
Usage Rights
All usage to be cleared by EMI Group Archive Trust

 

 

 

 

 

Special screening of ‘Memories of EMI’ Sunday 22 June

Hayes Past, Present and Future

Our friends from the EMI Archive Trust have been invited to screen a selection of material from their ‘Memories of EMI’ project,  Sunday 22 June 2014, as part of this year’s ‘Calling the Tune Film Festival’ at: The Old Vinyl Factory, Blyth Road, Hayes, Middlesex. 

After the screening Joanna Hughes, Curator for the EMI Archive Trust will be on hand to film your Memories of EMI.

12-2pm (Doors Open 11.30pm)  £Free but booking essential

A presentation from Hayes students of their projects on the history of Hayes, followed by a screening of ‘At Your Service (1962)’, a comedic short film made by Hayes Town Council in the 1960s about the services provided in the borough. The event will also feature a selection of material from The EMI Archive Trust ‘Memories of EMI’ project. GET TICKETS

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All screenings take place at: The Old Vinyl Factory, Blyth Road, Hayes, Middlesex UB3 1HA Train 20mins from Paddington to Hayes and Harlington, First Great Western Service. Bus 140, 195, 350, 696, 698, 90, E6, H98, U4, U5 to Hayes and Harlington Station. Car There is free car parking on site for all visitors with a valid ticket to the festival. Accessibility The Old Vinyl Factory is fully accessible to wheelchair users and there are disabled toilet facilities on site. Please contact a member of staff prior to your visit if you have specific access requirements.

Recording Pioneers- Part 7, William Barry Owen

 

Name:              William Barry Owen

Born:              15 April 1860

Resident:        Born in Vineyard Haven, Massachusetts

Occupation:   Sent to London to raise investment funds for the Gramophone Company to expand into Europe

Loves:             Music, Musicians, Gambling, London high society parties

 

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In July 1897 William Barry Owen resigned from his post with the National Gramophone Company in the United States and sailed for Britain. He was sent by Emile Berliner, inventor of the Gramophone and flat disc to set up the company in England and find investors. When he arrived he met a young Welsh lawyer; Trevor Lloyd Williams who became his co-founder of The British Gramophone Company in 1899.

Owen was an excellent sales man, having refined his selling talents as a sales man during his law degree at Amherst College. He was also a gambler who enjoyed the high stakes of starting up new ventures and more importantly he enjoyed living the high life that could be achieved if successful and so he jumped at the potential high profits in Berliner’s new Gramophone.

Initially he threw himself into the work but found high society London to be a tough crowd to crack, the Gramophones were selling but he found it difficult to attract investors to help build the business. It was his idea to bring in the Lambert Typewriter as an insurance product in case the Gramophone flopped. However, as fate would have it, the Lambert typewriter failed to bring in much revenue and The Gramophone Company stopped production in 1904. At this point Owen seemed to loose interest in the business,  he remained on the board for two more years and then left The Gramophone Company altogether in 1906.

After resigning he left Britain and returned home to the United States where he made several unsuccessful attempts in the agricultural business. By 1910 he had spent all of his money and was riddled with debt. He spent the rest of his life living off a pension paid jointly by Victor Talking Machine and The Gramophone Company.

Top 10 Aussie Sopranos

By Roger Neil

Sound of the Hound guest blogger
Someone started a thread on the unofficial BBC Radio 3 message boards asking for nominations for the top ten sopranos.

It seemed to me that the emerging lists were filled with the usual suspects, and since I’m currently in the process (with Tony Locantro) of finishing up a 4 x CD set for Decca Australia entitled ‘From Melba to Sutherland: Australian Singers on Record’, this is the list I offered:

Melba as Rosina

Nellie Melba
Frances Alda
Elsa Stralia
Florence Austral
Margherita Grandi
Marjorie Lawrence
Sylvia Fisher
Joan Hammond
Elsie Morison
Joan Sutherland

What a team. Other nominations?

If you  have loved this article by Roger Neil you can find more articles on the Official Roger Neil blog.

 

Link

Memories of EMI, Rupert Perry

The strong legacy of EMI is a testament to the people who worked for the company and those who loved the music across the years. We’d love to hear from those who have worked for EMI and from those who have enjoyed the music from outside of the company. What music they love? Which artists they adore? What shows they saw? And any other memories of the music that came out of EMI.
We’d love to see your pictures and learn who is in the photo and what is going on? As well as video’s of your favourite songs from across the years.

Staff from the EMI Archive Trust sat down with a previous EMI executive, Rupert Perry, to talk about a photograph when EMI staff were celebrating achieving the  No. 1 Single, No.1 Album and No.1 Video at the EMI Records Manchester Square building in 1987. (Image courtesy of the Rupert Perry Collection.)

No. 1 Single, No.1 Album and No.1 Video at the EMI Records Manchester Square building in 1987

No. 1 Single, No.1 Album and No.1 Video at the EMI Records Manchester Square building in 1987

Take a look at a blog post of his thoughts via this link.

If you have any of your own #memoriesofEMI stories to share please get in touch!

Recording Pioneers- Part 6

Frederick William Gaisberg 1873 – 1951

“Fred was clearly one of those Children with a natural talent for the keyboard, and his mother made the most of this opportunity from the moment she began to teach him when he was four.”

-Extract from ‘A Voice in Time’ – Jerrold Northrop Moore

 Name:               Frederick William Gaisberg

Born:              1 January 1873

Resident:        Born in Washington DC, immigrated to the United Kingdom as a young man of only 25 in 1898

Occupation:   Sound Recording Engineer, A&R Supreme

Loves:             Travelling, musicians, engineering

Fred Gaisberg

© Courtesy of EMI Group Archive Trust

Fred Gaisberg’s love affair with music began at the early age of just four.  From the age of eight until his voice broke Fred was a chorister at St John’s Episcopal Church, here he met and studied under one of Washington’s most celebrated artists of the time – the young master of the United States Marine Band, John Philip Sousa.

“I attended rehearsals in his then modest home in the Navy Yard in South Washington. He (Sousa) patted me on the head and made quite a pet of me… I was one of those music-mad youngsters who hovered by his podium and never missed a concert.”

-Fred Gaisberg recalling his childhood

Although he was an excellent singer, the piano remained his first love and after securing a scholarship to study piano he gained a reputation for his excellent playing and accompanying and was soon playing for charitable organisations and amateur organisation throughout the city. In 1889 in search of some more pocket money, the sixteen year old Gaisberg came across an advert for the Columbia Phonograph Company.  They were looking for someone to play the piano loudly and clearly enough for its sounds to be captured by the apparatus as the accompaniment for a musician to record.

One of the first musicians selected to record with Gaisberg was John York Atlee, a Whistler. Together they would churn out in three’s countless records of performances of ‘Whistling Coon’, ‘Mocking Bird’, and the ‘Laughing Song’.  These recordings were made on small hollow cylinders of wax, where a needle moved gradually in a lateral way etching the grooves that represented the sound waves into the wax.

Fred Gaisberg secured his first job working at the Columbia Phonograph Company. He spent the next few years working for various people within the growing phonograph industry, including Thomas Edison.

In 1894 he met Emile Berliner and his career took on a new direction. His fascination with Berliner’s novel recording process was the start of his career change from an accompanying pianist to a recording sound engineer. Very soon after meeting and working under Berliner, Gaisberg was sent to London to record music for the European market, working with Trevor Lloyd Williams and William Barry Owen.

Once he reached London he was introduced to another sound engineer – Sinkler Derby and together they continued to travel all over the world recording local music for the ever expanding Gramophone Company. His travels are well documented in “The Fred Gaisberg Diaries” which have been made available by Hugo Strötbaum.  Fred Gaisberg was without a doubt one of the single biggest contributors to the success of the Gramophone Company.  More details on exactly what he got up to can be found in our Gaisberg Travels blog series.

Fred Gaisberg and Sinkler Derby