Mystery Object of the week #10 Answer

Congratulations to Rolf Christian Holth Olsen who correctly identify this weeks mystery object – The Lioretograph Model 2 phonogragh – created by the Parisian watchmaker Henri Lioret in 1898.

Lioretograph Model 2 part of the EMI Group Archive Trust Collection
Lioretograph Model 2 part of the EMI Group Archive Trust Collection

This particular model – The Lioretograph Model 2 – came in a fitted case dating from 1899/1900. Lioret used his watchmaker’s knowledge to create a machine with a curious mixture of high-class clock work motors coupled with wire and cardboard for the acoustic mechanism.

On the front flap of the case are instructions for use in French, the rest of the case interior is finished in a green cloth.  A compartment to the left of the case contains cylinders housed in cardboard boxes (6 x 2m cylinders).

The reproducer is made form cardboard with spring-tension to the mica diaphragm and a series of graduated cardboard rings inside the drum-shaped body, leading to a short celluloid conical horn.

Unlike Columbia and Edison phonographs, the Lioretograph had no feedscrew, and its celluloid and brass 2 minute cylinders were held by a split taper-pin.

 Lioretograph Model 2 designed by Henri Lioret 1898 – Courtesy of the EMI Group Archive Trust Collection.

Mystery Object of the week #10

The mysteries of the universe never end… and so it is with the Hound who returns with another ‘mystery object of the week’.  Write in if you know what it is?

emiat-23-1-cropped

Clue…………………………….l’inventeur a été le premier horloger à Paris!

 

HOLY BAT LOGIC ADAM WEST IS ON TARGET!

We know how our Hound readers like little quirky stories – so when our eagle eyed EMI archivist saw the 200th episode of Big Bang with Adam West she remembered the  pics of him held deep in the EMI vault!

Courtesy of EMI Archive
Courtesy of EMI Archive – Adam West as Batman in London!

The record was on Target ….which we think was licensed to EMI. We’d love to hear from our Hound readers on any Adam/Batman related stories.

Courtesy of EMI Archive
The Story of Batman – Adam Batman West 1976

 

Courtesy of EMI Archive
Courtesy of EMI Archive – Adam West is Batman on UK tour 1976

Tonight – People’s History of Pop

The first episode of the People’s History of Pop is to be broadcast on BBC Four at 9pm tonight, as part of the year-long My Generation season.

Twiggy.jpg

Photo courtesy of BBC People’s History of Pop
Episode one sees Twiggy unearth pop treasures including a recording of John Lennon’s first-ever recorded performance with his band The Quarrymen, at a fete in Liverpool on the day he met Paul McCartney for the first time – which viewers will see Twiggy with David Hughes – Chair of EMI Group Archive Trust – listening to at the legendary Abbey Road studios.

Quarrymen tape recorder courtesy of the EMI Group Archive Trust.

EMI are taking a trip down memory lane at Hayes Old Vinyl Factory

EMI are inviting former employees at the Old Vinyl Factory in Hayes, to come back and share their memories of the iconic site.

The factory was a major employer for the town and produced records by some of the world’s best-known artists, including The Beatles, The Rolling Stones and Cliff Richard.

The reunion will take place on Wednesday, February 3, from 10am-1pm and is hosted by the EMI Archive Trust in conjunction with the BBC for their People’s History of Pop project.

Back in the day: The Old Vinyl Factory in Hayes

 

 

 

If you would like to come along, send your RSVP details to 7Wonder, the production company working with BBC on the People’s History of Pop project, at: phop@7wonder.co.uk or telephone 0203 701 7615.

Read the full article by NE  www.getwestlondon.co.uk 25th January 2016

Rare Recordings – From The EMI Vaults #2

Moo! Baa! Oink! Quack! or Happy New Year!

We are proud to present another rare recording uncovered by our friends from the EMI Archive Trust.

118 years ago Trevor Lloyd Williams, legal eagle and first Chairman of The Gramophone Company, stepped into the newly established Maiden Lane studio to record his famous party piece of farmyard animal sounds!

The result ……well not bad for a lawyer!

 

Early recordings supplied courtesy of the EMI Archive Trust.

Trevor Lloyd Williams  ‘Morning on the Farm’ 7″ Berliner E9292 – 1899

His Master’s Voices – new radio series

BBC Radio 4  Monday 23rd – Friday 27th November 2015 each day at 1.45 pm

(except Wednesday 25th at 3.45pm)

Cerys Matthews and Tristram Penna use their music industry careers to examine the legacy and stories behind some of the first Gramophone records recorded in Britain from 1898-1902.

For a sneak preview LISTEN HERE to Cerys on 6 22/11/2015 – scroll to 28 minutes 10 seconds.

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Cerys Matthews and Tris Penna visit Wyndham’s Theatre in London’s West End where they meet on stage the current leading actor Kenneth Cranham.

Early recordings are courtesy of the EMI Archive Trust.

LISTEN HERE – Chairman of the Gramophone Company, Trevor Williams recording his party piece of farmyard animal sounds -1898

A Sue Clark Production for BBC Radio 4.

This programme will be available shortly after broadcast

Presenter: Cerys Matthews and Tris Penna

Producer: Tris Penna

Exec Producer: Sue Clark

Sound Design: Peregrine Andrews

Rare Recordings – From The EMI Vaults

Miss Christabel Pankhurst – Speech on Suffrage for Women

Christabel Pankhurst, a leading Suffragette, was one of the primary strategists of the campaign for women’s right to vote in the first decades of the twentieth century. Christabel was jailed in 1907 and 1909 and was dubbed the ‘Queen of the Mob’ by the media, as described in this contemporary press release.

Miss Christabel Pankhurst
One of the leading figures in the militant movement organised to gain the suffrage for women, Miss Pankhurst was a joint founder and leader with her mother (Mrs. Pankhurst) of the Women’s Social and Political Union, which from 1910 to 1914 carried out a series of violent demonstrations of various kinds, which included the destruction of property, and even assaults upon persons. Miss Pankhurst was frequently arrested, imprisoned and liberated, under the famous “Cat and Mouse” Act, which was passed to deal with militant suffragist and it was during this time the “hunger strike” in prison was introduced by the suffragist. Since the gaining of suffrage by women, Miss Pankhurst has led the Women’s Party, which is devoted to social progress. This record was made a few hours after her release from Holloway prison, after one of her many terms of imprisonment.

Speech on Suffrage for Women
Date recorded (78) 1909
No 01016 Size 12 Label Black (single-sided)

Courtesy of The EMI Group Archive Trust

Chekhov’s Band – Eastern European Klezmer Music from the EMI Archives,1908-1913

 Chekhov’s Band – Eastern European Klezmer Music from the EMI Archives,1908-1913
Chekhov’s Band – Eastern European Klezmer Music from the EMI Archives,1908-1913

 

All recordings used in this the making of this CD form part of The EMI Archive Trust, a heritage organisation set up to preserve the first 50 years of the Gramophone Company (later EMI) 1897-1946 http://www.emiarchivetrust.org

Produced by Renair Records  www.jewishrecords.co.uk

Distribution by Honest Jons    www.honestjons.com

“The Dream of Gerontius”, Elgar’s opus 38 – Vivid memories from April 1945

By Ted Gadsby     

“The Dream of Gerontius”, Elgar’s opus 38 – Vivid memories from April 1945

April this year marked the 70th anniversary of the recording in Huddersfield Town Hall of the ‘Dream’, an occasion I witnessed at first hand. Could an 8-year old claim to have appreciated what was going on, and how much is it a genuine memory or later study? I confirm how I was deeply moved – this guaranteeing for me what I genuinely recall. I experienced a spiritual wakening at the choir’s affirmation of “Praise to the Holiest” and the lingering of Heddle Nash’s frightened, dying and weak voice shook this child on that day. I was hooked.

Sir Edward Elgar conducting first record 'Carissima' Jan 1914, possibly at City Road - Early 20th century recordings.  Image supplied Courtesy of The  EMI Group Archive Trust
Sir Edward Elgar conducting first record ‘Carissima’ Jan 1914, possibly at City Road – Early 20th century recordings. Image supplied Courtesy of The EMI Group Archive Trust

From the Mayor’s box (there were, maybe, 14 or 16 Huddersfield Choral Society (HCS) committee members, friends and civic dignitaries) we looked down into the auditorium; no other non-participants were present, just performers and recording engineers. I had been taken there by my father, Hugh Frederic Gadsby (on leave from the RAF) and his own father, Frederic Walter Gadsby, a long-serving member of the HCS Committee (and its President: 1947-1949). I remember acute embarrassment as my elders in the mayor’s box stood up in unison – and I demurely followed – on two occasions to demand a re-start.

In those days of direct shellac recording re-starts were discouraged – get it right first time! I remember the repetitive stops & starts as successive maximum-12 minute sections were put down for each of the 78-rpm’s 24 sides onto which the master (HMV recording C.3435-3446) was directly archived. Only those two sides (nos. 4 & 9 out of 24) were re-started, a remarkable contrast to today’s ‘perfecting-technology’. Cleverly, the sound technicians, I learned since, over-lapped many of the sides “as if anticipating how this could help bring together the recording as a whole at sometime in the future.”

This had been the first recording of the full 1900 work (those in 1927 under Elgar himself had been of extracts only). So, how did this performance compare with later ones? Bill Rosen has posed five short questions: Was Elgar England’s finest composer? Is The Dream of Gerontius his finest work (“the best of me”)? Was this Sargent’s finest hour and his 1945 recording of this work the greatest ever made? Was Heddle Nash the finest Gerontius ever? Whilst I am ill-qualified to compare this with a dozen post-war recordings, Rosen believes that others played the drama too early, Sargent (1945) sustaining it to the end. Perhaps his 1941 performance in London’s Queen’s Hall, hours before its destruction, moved and motivated him.

For years I had to make do with a poor cassette recording of an 8th December 1978 Radio 3 broadcast taped from the original discs, until I obtained, with great joy, the 2006 Direct Audio Transfer made by Pristine Audio (PACO.009). Despite bringing me a beautifully continuous performance, it will never cloud my personal reminiscences of that day. Two questions I pose: Does anyone know the exact date in April 1945 and, is there anyone else alive who bore witness to this musical treat? HCS’s 125th anniversary booklet (1961) omits this major contribution to choral music in its Notable Dates, it being covered in the Performance Listing.

Perhaps my visits to Birmingham Oratory, passing Cardinal Newman’s own office also adds a touch of sentiment! Being an early music buff, I don’t relish Gladys Ripley’s style, but my heart savours the whole. Heddle Nash’s “Take me away” will never be surpassed.

I was indeed so privileged to have witnessed the occasion, and after this arduous day was done, I proudly remembered being introduced to Mr. Herbert Bardgett, chorus master since 1932, and being patted on the head by Dr. Malcolm himself (two years before his knighthood)!

Comments invited and publication and archiving encouraged – by Ted Gadsby  

If you are interested in taking part or would like more information about the Memories of EMI Campaign please contact:  email: info@emiarchivetrust.org
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