HOLY BAT LOGIC ADAM WEST IS ON TARGET!

We know how our Hound readers like little quirky stories – so when our eagle eyed EMI archivist saw the 200th episode of Big Bang with Adam West she remembered the  pics of him held deep in the EMI vault!

Courtesy of EMI Archive

Courtesy of EMI Archive – Adam West as Batman in London!

The record was on Target ….which we think was licensed to EMI. We’d love to hear from our Hound readers on any Adam/Batman related stories.

Courtesy of EMI Archive

The Story of Batman – Adam Batman West 1976

 

Courtesy of EMI Archive

Courtesy of EMI Archive – Adam West is Batman on UK tour 1976

Friday Mystery Object of the week #9 Answer

And the answer is… The Lumiere Gramophone (HMV Model 460). Well done to those of you who answered correctly!

lumiere watermark

The Lumiere Gramophones were a great novelty of 1924, making a highly successful debut at the Piccadilly Hotel, London, on Wednesday 22nd October an esteemed audience.The HMV Model 460 was introduced in early 1925, and is unique by virtue of its Lumiere pleated diaphragm instead of a conventional horn. This enabled the tone arm and sound box to be eliminated and in theory would have been cheaper to make (the price tag didn’t reflect this). The sound produced was less directional than a horn, but as the diaphragm was fragile and easily damaged, the 460 was removed from the catalogue after about a year. The cabinets were then used for the Model 461 which used a conventional internal horn and soundbox. It originally cost £22 in Oak, and £25 in mahogany.

Recording Pioneers- Part 6

Frederick William Gaisberg 1873 – 1951

“Fred was clearly one of those Children with a natural talent for the keyboard, and his mother made the most of this opportunity from the moment she began to teach him when he was four.”

-Extract from ‘A Voice in Time’ – Jerrold Northrop Moore

 Name:               Frederick William Gaisberg

Born:              1 January 1873

Resident:        Born in Washington DC, immigrated to the United Kingdom as a young man of only 25 in 1898

Occupation:   Sound Recording Engineer, A&R Supreme

Loves:             Travelling, musicians, engineering

Fred Gaisberg

© Courtesy of EMI Group Archive Trust

Fred Gaisberg’s love affair with music began at the early age of just four.  From the age of eight until his voice broke Fred was a chorister at St John’s Episcopal Church, here he met and studied under one of Washington’s most celebrated artists of the time – the young master of the United States Marine Band, John Philip Sousa.

“I attended rehearsals in his then modest home in the Navy Yard in South Washington. He (Sousa) patted me on the head and made quite a pet of me… I was one of those music-mad youngsters who hovered by his podium and never missed a concert.”

-Fred Gaisberg recalling his childhood

Although he was an excellent singer, the piano remained his first love and after securing a scholarship to study piano he gained a reputation for his excellent playing and accompanying and was soon playing for charitable organisations and amateur organisation throughout the city. In 1889 in search of some more pocket money, the sixteen year old Gaisberg came across an advert for the Columbia Phonograph Company.  They were looking for someone to play the piano loudly and clearly enough for its sounds to be captured by the apparatus as the accompaniment for a musician to record.

One of the first musicians selected to record with Gaisberg was John York Atlee, a Whistler. Together they would churn out in three’s countless records of performances of ‘Whistling Coon’, ‘Mocking Bird’, and the ‘Laughing Song’.  These recordings were made on small hollow cylinders of wax, where a needle moved gradually in a lateral way etching the grooves that represented the sound waves into the wax.

Fred Gaisberg secured his first job working at the Columbia Phonograph Company. He spent the next few years working for various people within the growing phonograph industry, including Thomas Edison.

In 1894 he met Emile Berliner and his career took on a new direction. His fascination with Berliner’s novel recording process was the start of his career change from an accompanying pianist to a recording sound engineer. Very soon after meeting and working under Berliner, Gaisberg was sent to London to record music for the European market, working with Trevor Lloyd Williams and William Barry Owen.

Once he reached London he was introduced to another sound engineer – Sinkler Derby and together they continued to travel all over the world recording local music for the ever expanding Gramophone Company. His travels are well documented in “The Fred Gaisberg Diaries” which have been made available by Hugo Strötbaum.  Fred Gaisberg was without a doubt one of the single biggest contributors to the success of the Gramophone Company.  More details on exactly what he got up to can be found in our Gaisberg Travels blog series.

Fred Gaisberg and Sinkler Derby

Nipper 1884 – 1895

Name:            Nipper

Born:              1884

Resident:        London

Occupation:   Posing for paintings, attacking Gramophones, looking for His   Masters Voice

Loves:              Being a world famous icon, treats

Francis Barraud’s painting of a fox terrier to an early gramophone remains one of the oldest and best-known of trademarks and records logos. It was a brilliantly conceived piece of commercial art that has become one of the worlds most recognised trade marks.

Courtesy of  EMI Group Archive Trust

Courtesy of EMI Group Archive Trust

Nipper was a stray dog found by Mark Barraud (Francis Barraud’s brother) in 1884. He was called Nipper because he a habit of nipping at the back legs of any visitors. Nipper became Francis’ pet three years later when Mark died.  The iconic ‘His Master’s Voice’ painting was made some time before 1899, although in the original Nipper was listening to an Edison phonograph.

On May 31, 1899, Barraud went to the Maiden Lane offices of The Gramophone Company with the intention of borrowing a brass horn to replace the original black horn on the painting. Manager William Barry Owen suggested that if the artist replaced the machine with a Berliner disc gramophone the Company would buy the painting.  Since then Nipper has been the face of a huge global brand the ‘His Master’s Voice’ painting is one of the most recognised trademarks in the world.

Courtesy of  EMI Group Archive Trust

Courtesy of EMI Group Archive Trust

Recording Pioneers- Part 5

Francis Barraud 1856 – 1924

“The whole world saw it and succumbed to its charm”

-Alfred Clark comments on the painting

Name:                   Francis Barraud

Born:                    June 16, 1856

Resident:             Born in London

Occupation:         Artist, Painter, stray dog lover

Loves:                 Painting, animals

Francis James Barraud was born into a family of artists in London. He studied art at the Royal Academy School and in Antwerp. An accomplished technician, he was a frequent exhibitor at the Royal Academy and else where. One of his early works An encore Too Many is displayed in the Liverpool Walker Art Gallery, and the painting His Master’s Voice brought him world wide fame.

Francis Barraud, in his studio. ©  Courtesy of  EMI Group Archive Trust

Francis Barraud, in his studio.
© Courtesy of EMI Group Archive Trust

Barraud was never to recapture that success, however and by 1913 he was in financial straits. When he learned of this situation Alfred Clark commissioned Barraud to paint a copy of His Master’s Voice for the Victor Company. Thereafter, Barraud painted a total of 24 copies of his most famous work. In recognition of these services, the Gramophone and Victor Companies paid Barraud a pension. His Master’s Voice remains one of the world’s best-known trademarks.

A Royal Arrival

Crying-Baby-001

The EMI Archive Trust would like to join the whole world in saying CONGRATULATIONs to William and Kate, the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, on the arrival of their beautiful baby Boy.

For many centuries the royal family has always been incredibly supportive of the arts and music. We are excited to watch this new baby grow and continue that tradition.

The Gramophone Company, His Masters Voice and EMI have always had very strong links with the royal establishment since its beginning at the start of the 20th century.

GABPCA71I2XD

The King to his people’s Part 1 and 2. Broadcast from Buckingham Palace by H.M King George VI on September 3rd 1939 recorded exclusively with His Masters Voice Records.

retrieve[8]

Empire Day Messages; To the Girls and boys of the empire from His majesty King George the fifth and her majesty Queen Mary. Recorded at Buckingham Palace exclusively with His Masters Voice Records.

Story Telling Pictures by Peter Kemp

The Hound heartily thanks Roel Kruize in bringing to our attention the artist Peter Kemp.

Peter’s Kemp’s award winning photography is best described as “Story Telling Pictures”. The image below is the second in a series of 4 photographs in the “His Masters Voice – HMV series” which pays homage to this great music label under the name “Musica”. Kemp is truly dedicated to his art – usually spending months preparing each photograph to ensure that his vision and creativity is fully realised. He has been praised for his dynamic concepts as well as his eye for capturing an entire narrative within each image.

Raffaella_neerkijkend-op-hond6-grootPhoto: Copyright Peter Kemp, Delft (NL) www.peterkemp.nl 

This photograph featuring the model Raffaela is a stunning portrayal of the early years in the Muisca/HMV Company. Notably it was a nominee in the “Framed Artist Award, 2013”. (The final winner was announced in Las Vegas, USA on March 12.)

The “His Masters Voice –  HMV series” came about when Peter Kemp’s cousin who is connected to Roel Kruize wife’s family heard that Kruize was the proud owner of a very special gramophone, a replica of Nipper and above all a copy of the famous painting. (One of only three in existence in Holland.) Kemp approached Kruize to borrow the art pieces for a long weekend. Despite being unfamiliar with Kemps work Roel was excited by the idea. Needless to say when Kruize received a copy of the photographs he was over the moon. The objects featured in the “HMV storytelling pictures series” belong to  Kruize  and therefore due credit goes to him for making this series possible. Roel Kruize devoted his life and career to the success of EMI and HMV . He worked for no other company. Was the senior manager of the Dutch EMI Company for many years and had positions in EMI International in A&R and Marketing worldwide (excluding USA.)  He has a profound love for EMI Classics and its phenomenal heritage

HIDDEN NIPPER IN NEW HMV SITE

Our regular commentator David Hughes tipped us off on this one:

Ah, hidden messages in HTML code, the hidden tracks of the internet. Various tweeters who, for some reason, can’t visit a website without checking in on the source code while they’re there, have spotted a cute little hidden addition to the code of the revamped HMV website, that went online as the flagging entertainment retailer emerged from administration last week. If Nipper can live on in the HMTL world, maybe HMV can survive in the digital era? Maybe.