Daphne Oram’s 1960’s Optical Synthesizer Oramics Machine – Electronic Music Pioneer

In the early ’60s, pioneering British composer Daphne Oram set out to create a synthesizer unlike any other, she called it the Oramics machine Commissioned by The Science Museum, London. Directed, Produced, Filmed and Edited by Nick Street and Jen Fearnley. Science Museum Oramics to Electronica: Revealing Histories of Electronic Music  Until Saturday 01 DecemberContinue reading “Daphne Oram’s 1960’s Optical Synthesizer Oramics Machine – Electronic Music Pioneer”

The oldest-known EMI recording desk

By Brain Kehew This mixer is the oldest-known EMI recording desk in existence. It was a bespoke design made for Abbey Road studios (then called the EMI Recording Studios Ltd.) When the studio complex was young, there was very little commercially-made studio equipment; so studios built their own. This desk is an early example ofContinue reading “The oldest-known EMI recording desk”

The arrival of wire-less

By Roger Neil I found this interview with Guglielmo Marconi in Leslie Baily’s BBC Scrapbooks. It was conducted in 1896 shortly after Marconi had installed a transmitter on the roof of the GPO and a receiver in a building on the Thames Embankment, 500 yards away.   “Was the message quite clearly received?” asked theContinue reading “The arrival of wire-less”

The strange origin of the UK Reggae big bass sound: John Hassell Recordings, Barnes.

Britain had developed a strong Reggae culture of its own by the mid-1970’s. Reggae, and its predecessors like Ska, naturally seeped into the UK via the communities of immigrants who had come to the country from Jamaica since the late 1940’s. Britain’s pop tendencies have often been to take music from the west (usually America)Continue reading “The strange origin of the UK Reggae big bass sound: John Hassell Recordings, Barnes.”